Fukushima timeline - September 2011

Radioactive News 5 September 2011

  • Killer Typhoon Brings More Misery to Japan

    Six months after a tsunami laid waste to northeastern Japan, a killer typhoon has brought more destruction to a different region, the area southwest of Tokyo. (Sept. 5)
    Source: AssociatedPress

  • Cesium-137 found in urine of child near Tokyo, despite mother’s stringent efforts at radiation protection — “Mixture of shock and a feeling that of course this is the case”

    The Japanese government has taken the position that no one outside of the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi plant is likely to suffer health effects from the radiation that has been released since March. Many Japanese, especially parents of young children, are doubtful.

    [The August 22 issue of AERA magazine, published by Asahi Shimbun, ran a feature on contamination in the Kanto region which] begins by reiterating a point that has been made frequently by critics of the Japanese government – that we simply do not know what effects low levels of radiation and the presence of isotopes in the human body will have on long-term health.

    The piece tells the story of a mother in Saitama Prefecture who, in the absence of direct government support, arranged to have a sample of her daughter’s urine tested.
    Source: enenews.com

  • Japan’s renewable energy solution

    Very short though his term may have been, Japanese and international media are now giving much credit to Kan for one landmark achievement: taking the first decisive step to end Japan’s age-old dependence on so-called “quick and dirty” solutions to its energy and electric power needs.

    In fact, Kan is now seen as a visionary political leader who may have ushered Japan into a new era of less reliance and dependence on nuclear and fossil fuel-powered energy.
    Source: manilastandardtoday.com

  • Contamination Outside Fukushima

    The extent of radioactive contamination in Fukushima Prefecture is at the center of important debates as some scientists, NGOs, and citizen’s groups argue that the Japanese government has not gone far enough in dealing with the fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi accident and has deliberately downplayed the potential health effects of radiation. With so much attention focused on Fukushima, however, there has been less consideration of the impact of the crisis, ongoing since March 11, on other parts of Japan. The August 22 issue of AERA magazine, published by Japan’s major progressive newspaper Asahi Shimbun, ran a feature on contamination in the Kanto region entitled Kanto no ko kara hoshano (Radiation Detected from Kanto Children), which broadens discussions of the Fukushima Daiichi crisis’ potential impact. Below is a summary of the AERA article, published under the byline of editor Yamane Yusaku.

    The Kanto region is a large area of central Japan that includes Tokyo and nearly 1/3 of Japan’s population including Tokyo. The Japanese government has taken the position that no one outside of the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi plant is likely to suffer health effects from the radiation that has been released since March. Many Japanese, especially parents of young children, are doubtful. The article begins by reiterating a point that has been made frequently by critics of the Japanese government – that we simply do not know what effects low levels of radiation and the presence of isotopes in the human body will have on long-term health. The piece tells the story of a mother in Saitama Prefecture who, in the absence of direct government support, arranged to have a sample of her daughter’s urine tested. The test indicated that despite stringent efforts to protect her fifth grader from exposure to contaminated food and airborne radiation, the result was 0.4 Bq of Cesium 137 per kilogram of urine. Cesium 137, with a half-life of just over 30 years, is one of main radioactive isotopes released from the Fukushima Daiichi plant.
    Source: japanfocus.org

  • Nuclear troubleshooter Hosono cites need for temporary storage facility at Fukushima

    "On the other hand, there are wide-ranging issues such as environmental pollution, steps to address global warming and biodiversity,"

    webmasters comment:

    He better be a good shot, beacuse troubles are only starting to form an offensive... and btw... "wide-ranging issue of biodiversity"? Biodiversity in media usually gets mentioned in connection to mass extinctions events and cataclysmic predictions.
    Source: mdn.mainichi.jp

  • Renewables top 20 percent of Germany’s energy mix for first time

    Solar power saw the biggest jump, increasing by 76 percent over 2010

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, tens of thousands of German citizens took to the streets calling for the phase out of atomic energy. In May, the German government bowed to public pressure and unveiled its plan to shut down the country's 17 nuclear power plants by 2021 - with the possibility that three will continue operating until 2022 if the transition to renewable energy doesn't go as quickly as hoped.

    webmasters comment:

    Notice how article correctly attributes the change in energy politics to popular public movement, while most of mainstream media tries to paint the shift as an act of lonewolf econut Frau Merkel.

    Source: www.gizmag.com

  • Making Tohoku region final repository site for all nuclear waste simply not fair

    Nuclear waste was supposed to have been reprocessed to be used again as fuel, if things had gone according to the government's 2005 Framework for Nuclear Energy Policy. But neither the prospects for recycling facilities nor fast- breeder nuclear reactors are good. And Japan has no final repositories. This is where the interim storage facilities come in, to buy time -- several decades -- until new technology is established to handle the problem on a more permanent basis.

    webmasters comment:

    Nuclear industry and fortunetellers are the only ones that can stay in business on a presumption that problems will disapear magically in the future.

    Source: mdn.mainichi.jp

  • Anti-nuclear protestors removed from Mühleberg

    Police have cleared one of two groups of protestors from the Mühleberg atomic power plant outside the capital, Bern. The 20 or so demonstrators said they did not resist.

    The protest action began on Sunday morning when around 50 activists blocked direct road access to the plant. In the early afternoon a second group blocked the bridge to Mühleberg, making the power station only accessible by foot or bicycle from the village of Gümmenen.

    Police have not said how long they will tolerate the second group of demonstrators.

    Protestors at Mühleberg have said it is a scandal that the authorities continue to ignore reality and have no emergency evacuation plans in the event of a disaster at the controversial plant, which has been on the electricity grid since 1972.
    Source: swissinfo.ch

  • All of Japan should take in Fukushima toxic waste - minister

    Goshi Hosono, the environment minister who is also responsible with handling the ongoing nuclear crisis, said that the entire Japan should help during the process of nuclear waste disposal from Fukushima.

    Other prefectures should provide sites for contaminated debris and soil disposal, Hosono said. This would be a way to share Fukushima’s difficult situation, according to the minister.
    Source: tokyotimes.jp

  • TABLE-Japan nuclear plant ops (Ikata No.1 shut for maintenance)

    Sept 5 (Reuters) - The following table shows the operational status of Japan's nuclear power plants. Shikoku Electric Power Co said it shut the 566-megawatt No. 1 reactor at its Ikata plant on Sunday as scheduled for planned maintenance. The shutdown means 11 reactors in Japan with a capacity of 9,864 MW are generating electricity, so just 20.1 percent of the nation's total nuclear power capacity is in use. Public fears about nuclear safety after the Fukushima nuclear crisis have prevented local governments from giving utilities the go-ahead to restart reactors. Shikoku has said it plans to conduct three-months worth of maintenance at the No. 1 Ikata reactor. Japan, the world's third-biggest nuclear power user, currently has 54 reactors for commercial use, with a total generating capacity of 48,960 megawatts. In the table below, capacities are shown in megawatts. "P" represents a planned regular inspection shutdown and "U" an unplanned shutdown.
    Source: af.reuters.com

  • Japan may soon lose top longevity ranking

    TOKYO — Japan has long been the world leader in longevity, but some experts are now suggesting that the island nation may soon face a drop in the rankings.

    “In an era of economic stagnation, political turmoil, aging populations, and inadequate tobacco control, Japan does not seem to be effective in addressing its new set of health challenges,”

    webmasters comment:

    Thats it... honestly... economic stagnation, political turmoil, aging populations, and inadequate tobacco control...

    Source: japantoday.com

  • Landslides confirmed at 54 locations in Japan

    Torrential rain brought by tropical storm Talas has caused landslides in at least 54 locations across central and western Japan, and a risk of more is posing a threat to rescue and relief efforts.

    webmasters comment:

    natures way of saying that radiation doesnt just disapear into the ground?

    Source: nhk.or.jp

  • Tochigi moving radioactive ash to 6 sewage plants

    Tochigi Prefecture had incinerated the sludge from its sewage plants at its waste water recycling plant, and melted the ash to reduce its volume. But the amount of ash has reached 1,000 tons, close to the storage capacity.

    To deal with the problem, the prefecture decided last month to keep the radioactive waste at 6 of its waste water treatment plants.
    Source: nhk.or.jp

  • INTERVIEW: Japan to Determine N-Reactor Decommissioning thru Stress Tests

    On where to temporarily store debris and soil contaminated by radioactive material spewed from the crippled Fukushima No. 1 power complex, Hosono said the government has no choice but to ask Fukushima Prefecture to accept a proposal to set up a storage facility in the prefecture.
    Source: jen.jiji.com

  • Hosono: "We All Have to Share the Pain of Fukushima"

    Goshi Hosono, former assistant to ex-prime minister Kan Naoto, current minister in charge of the Fukushima nuclear accident and the new Minister of the Environment whose Ministry will have the regulatory agency for the nuclear industry and will be in charge also of the government "decontamination" and cleanup effort in Tohoku, declared on September 4 that the entire Japan must share the pain of Fukushima.
    Source: ex-skf.blogspot.com

  • Kunihiko Takeda: "A Girl Doesn't Talk"

    Professor Takeda of Chubu University has an unusual, short post on his blog for September 5. It's titled "A Girl Doesn't Talk..." and the following is my unauthorized, quick translation:
    Source: ex-skf.blogspot.com

  • Fukushima No. 3 reactor bottom's temperature falls below 100 C

    Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Monday that the temperature of the crippled No. 3 nuclear reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi atomic power plant has fallen below 100 C, signaling progress toward the plant's cold shutdown.

    webmasters comment:

    probably the fuel melted 2 deep into the ground to keep heating the reactor from OUTSIDE...

    Source: english.kyodonews.jp

 

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