Fukushima timeline | Radioactive news December 2011

UC Davis Researcher: Sea Water Can Corrode Nuclear Fuel, Forming Uranium Compounds That Could Travel Long Distance


  • UC Davis Researcher: Sea Water Can Corrode Nuclear Fuel, Forming Uranium Compounds That Could Travel Long Distance

    From UC Davis News and Information (1/26/2012; emphasis is mine):

    Japan used seawater to cool nuclear fuel at the stricken Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear plant after the tsunami in March 2011 -- and that was probably the best action to take at the time, says Professor Alexandra Navrotsky of the University of California, Davis.

    But Navrotsky and others have since discovered a new way in which seawater can corrode nuclear fuel, forming uranium compounds that could potentially travel long distances, either in solution or as very small particles. The research team published its work Jan. 23 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Source: ex-skf.blogspot.com


 

Fukushima casts a shadow over India's industrial boom


  • Fukushima casts a shadow over India's industrial boom

    The ongoing nuclear disaster in Fukushima has quashed once ambitious plans for the construction of new reactors in Japan. The government does, however, remain committed to promoting exports of nuclear reactors and technology as it sees huge potential in overseas markets.

    Nuclear energy will fuel the roaring economies of China and India, although in the latter, popular protests are slowing expansion. In Tamil Nadu, civic groups such as the National Alliance of People's Movements and the People's Movement Against Nuclear Energy have opposed commissioning the Koodankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) that was built with Russian assistance.

    webmasters comment:

    desc. bellow the article photo states:

    Business trip: Trade and Industry Minister Yukio Edano at a Nissan plant in Chennai on Jan. 10. Since 2000, Japanese firms have invested over $5 billion in Tamil Nadu

    posting in case someone is wondering why they are shooting anti nuclear protestors in India.

    Source: japantimes.co.jp


 

Government agency to develop solar atlas of India to help development of solar power projects


  • Government agency to develop solar atlas of India to help development of solar power projects

    CHENNAI: When India's solar power developers want to choose a site for their project, they usually turn to NASA and its satellite images to identify the best locations.

    This is because even though India is endowed with abundant sunshine, it is vital to know the exact spots to locate projects so that they become viable. The US space agency's radiation maps help them do this, but they are not quite adequate.

    Now, an obscure government agency based in Chennai is promising to change that. It hopes to deliver within two years a state-of-the-art solar atlas of India that could clear a major hurdle obstructing speedy development of solar power projects.

    Source: economictimes.indiatimes.com


 

Renewable energy deals hit record high in 2011: report


  • Renewable energy deals hit record high in 2011: report

    (Reuters) - Global renewable energy deals climbed 40 percent to a record high of $53.5 billion last year from $38.2 billion in 2010, as solar, wind and energy efficiency overtook hydropower as the main deal drivers for the first time, a report said on Monday.

    Historically, hydro power has dominated renewables deal flow, but deals worth $1 billion or more in wind, solar, biomass and energy efficiency have outnumbered hydro by seven to one, the PriceWaterHouse Coopers report said.

    Source: reuters.com


   

New Georgia Nuclear Reactors Nearing Approval


  • New Georgia Nuclear Reactors Nearing Approval

    ATLANTA - A newspaper is reporting that regulators are expected to approve a $14 billion nuclear power project near Augusta within weeks.

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports on Sunday that the move by Southern Co. to build two new reactors at Plant Vogtle would be the nation's first new nuclear power reactors in three decades.

    Source: myfoxatlanta.com


 

The Nikkei to Japan's Manufacturers: To Survive, Invest Abroad


  • The Nikkei to Japan's Manufacturers: To Survive, Invest Abroad

    Anyone who knows Japan knows that the Japanese are extremely, often seemingly irrationally, cautious and risk averse. Any number of social and economic phenomena can be pointed to as evidence of this fact. World leading rates of buying and holding all manner of personal insurance policies would be just one example. For corporations, exceptionally—and, for sellers, unnervingly and expensively— long and pain-staking procurement or new project due diligence procedures, resulting, as often as not, in no decision, other than to require further study, would be another.

    Source: forbes.com


 

Active 200-km fault found off Honshu's Kii Peninsula


  • Active 200-km fault found off Honshu's Kii Peninsula

    An active fault around 200 km long that is believed to have been a source of huge quakes in the past has been found off Honshu's Kii Peninsula, according to researchers at the University of Tokyo.

    If the fault on the Nankai Trough moves, it could trigger a magnitude 8.0 earthquake, the researchers said, adding they have found a seabed cliff several hundred meters high that was created by the fault's past movements.

    Source: japantimes.co.jp


 

IAEA to set up Fukushima office to share info on nuclear crisis


  • IAEA to set up Fukushima office to share info on nuclear crisis

    DAVOS, Switzerland (Kyodo) -- The International Atomic Energy Agency plans to open a branch office in Japan's Fukushima Prefecture to promote international information sharing about the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, IAEA chief Yukiya Amano said Saturday.

    The plan is being considered at the request of the Japanese government, Amano told Kyodo News in the Swiss resort of Davos, where the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum is being held, noting that the IAEA intends to open the office by the end of this year.

    "We have told the Japanese government that the IAEA stands ready to cooperate," Amano said.

    Source: mdn.mainichi.jp


 

Japan finds water leaks at stricken nuclear plant


  • Japan finds water leaks at stricken nuclear plant

    (Reuters) - Japan's stricken nuclear power plant has leaked more than 600 liters of water, forcing it to briefly suspend cooling operations at a spent-fuel pond at the weekend, but none is thought to have escaped into the ocean, the plant's operator and domestic media said.

    Source: reuters.com


 

Anti-nuclear movement growing in Asia


  • Anti-nuclear movement growing in Asia

    Heonseok Lee has a simple way of describing how public sentiment toward nuclear power has changed in South Korea since the disaster at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant last March 11.

    “Before 3/11, I’d post an article criticizing the nuclear power industry, and right away there’d be hundreds of really nasty comments. After 3/11, there’ll still be a few dozen. But not hundreds,” says Lee, a full-time anti-nuclear activist in one of the world’s most pro-nuclear countries.

    Though nuclear power still has a strong foothold throughout the region, and public opinion is mixed, activists across Asia have anecdotes like this to show that anti-nuclear sentiment and protest are slowly growing from Mongolia, to South Korea to Taiwan and even - in modest ways - to China.

    This month, activists from Japan and South Korea announced plans for a new East Asian civil society network to promote renewable energy and oppose nuclear power.

    “The more we share information on the dangers on nuclear power and spread technology and wisdom regarding natural energy, the more East Asia will become the center of peace, not conflict; of life, not destruction,”

    Source: alaskadispatch.com


   

Nano Particle Evidence Shows Fukushima Might Be Part of a Depopulation Agenda


  • Nano Particle Evidence Shows Fukushima Might Be Part of a Depopulation Agenda

    Evidence from the Fukushima Diachi disaster yields results that show a ”natural weaponization” of nanno particles related to the inncodent, signifying the potential for a previously planned event.

    A report from the PNAS entitled Uranyl peroxide enhanced nuclear fuel corrosion in seawater reads;

    The Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear accident brought together compromised irradiated fuel and large amounts of seawater in a high radiation field. Based on newly acquired thermochemical data for a series of uranyl peroxide compounds containing charge-balancing alkali cations, here we show that nanoscale cage clusters containing as many as 60 uranyl ions, bonded through peroxide and hydroxide bridges, are likely to form in solution or as precipitates under such conditions. These species will enhance the corrosion of the damaged fuel and, being thermodynamically stable and kinetically persistent in the absence of peroxide, they can potentially transport uranium over long distances.

    Source: theintelhub.com


 

Governments Worldwide Raise Acceptable Radiation Levels


  • Governments Worldwide Raise Acceptable Radiation Levels

    Instead of Protecting People, Governments Cover Up by Raising “Safe” Radiation Levels

    American and Canadian authorities have virtually stopped monitoring airborne radiation.

    Neither American nor Canadian authorities are testing fish for radioactivity.

    Does that mean that we don’t have to worry about radiation from Fukushima?

    It is a little hard to know, given that what is deemed a “safe level” of radiation is determined by politics … rather than science.

    Source: theintelhub.com


 

Did the Dimona Dozen murder the Fukushima 50?


  • Did the Dimona Dozen murder the Fukushima 50?

    t took them three hundred years and trillions of dollars to build a theatre of darkness, yet the light of only one match can burn it down. Do not let this light go out. Archive and POST!

    Jim Stone, Freelance Journalist, Updated Wednesday, Dec 28, 2011

    This is a massive report. If you have troubles understanding it, just look at THIS picture of the vanished reactor, THIS picture of the destroyed facility and THIS picture, of Magna BSP's camera. Then scroll down to the photos of the NON EXISTENT quake damage and seismic charts which prove there was no 9.0 and therefore the very real tsunami could not have been natural. The fact that what happened in Japan did not occur naturally has been very well documented by a skilled investigator, who spent hundreds of hours getting to the bottom of this story.

    NEW INFO: Japan offered to enrich uranium for IRAN!

    Source: jimstonefreelance.com


   

Japan's plutonium stockpile builds as nuke fuel cycle policy hits dead end


  • Japan's plutonium stockpile builds as nuke fuel cycle policy hits dead end

    Japan's stockpile of plutonium had reached 45 metric tons by the end of 2010, inviting suspicion from the international community about what Japan intended to do with the fissile material. As a result, much hope has been pinned on a MOX fuel reactor being built in northern Japan to eventually consume that excess plutonium.

    MOX fuel is a mix of plutonium and different uranium oxides produced as waste by conventional reactors, and the Japanese government had hopes that plants that can burn it -- like one now under construction by the firm J-Power in Oma, Aomori Prefecture -- would become the foundations of a new nuclear fuel cycle. That cycle, which would see the spent fuel from conventional nuclear plants used again in MOX-burning plants, has yet to come close to fruition. Meanwhile, reprocessing of spent fuel into plutonium has continued apace, making the entire program a symbol of policy inconsistency.

    Source: mainichi.jp


 

Famed Aomori fishing port lives in shadow of new MOX fuel nuclear plant


  • Famed Aomori fishing port lives in shadow of new MOX fuel nuclear plant

    OMA, Aomori -- This town at the top of Aomori Prefecture is known nationwide for its tuna, and indeed the first tuna fish auctioned at Tokyo's Tsukiji Market in 2012 was hauled in by Oma fishermen. There is, however, something else afoot here that has thus far escaped much attention: the building of a MOX fuel-based nuclear plant.

    Construction of the reactor was started in 2008 by the Tokyo-based energy firm J-Power, and is designed to burn only MOX fuel -- a mix of plutonium and different oxides of uranium produced as waste from conventional reactors. Called a "full MOX" reactor, it will be the world's first light- water reactor of its kind to go into commercial service. It is also projected to have the greatest electricity output of any reactor in Japan, at more than 1.38 million kilowatts, and is a major link in Japan's nuclear fuel cycle policy.

    The technology faces some serious hurdles, however. For one, the plutonium in the fuel is highly toxic. Furthermore, control rods are less effective in light-water reactor cores burning MOX fuel instead of conventional uranium fuel, while spent MOX fuel also generates more heat and radiation, as well as large amounts of highly radioactive waste. So far, no processing methods have been devised.

    Source: mdn.mainichi.jp


 

Fukushima municipal heads urge gov't to submit clear, concrete reparation plans


  • Fukushima municipal heads urge gov't to submit clear, concrete reparation plans

    KORIYAMA, Fukushima -- Heads of multiple prefectural municipalities affected by the ongoing nuclear crisis urged the government to submit a clear and concrete reparation plan as soon as possible during a panel discussion a government committee held here on Jan. 27.

    Present at the meeting, organized by Dispute Reconciliation Committee for Nuclear Damage Compensation, were heads of 12 municipalities around the crippled plant, including Iitate, Minamisoma, Namie and Hirono, which are to be affected by the government's realignment of evacuation advisories.

    Source: mdn.mainichi.jp


 

Antinuclear activists refuse to move tents from gov't land


  • Antinuclear activists refuse to move tents from gov't land

    TOKYO (Kyodo) -- Antinuclear activists rejected a call by the industry ministry to remove their tents from its precincts by 5 p.m. Friday, and continued a four-month-old occupation of ministry grounds to press their demand for the closure of all nuclear power plants in Japan.

    The activists said they will not move the tents until the government promises not to allow idled nuclear reactors to resume operating. The ministry said it will not try to evict the activists by force but continue to ask them to remove the tents voluntarily.

    On Friday, hundreds of people attended a gathering of antinuclear activists in front of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, chanting "stop nuclear power plants" and "give us back Fukushima."

    Source: mdn.mainichi.jp


 

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